Gravitational wave astronomy school program

The school will take place over three days, two at UWA (Mon, Tues) and the third at Gingin (Wed). Please note that the bus for Gingin leaves UWA early at 7:30 , so please give yourself enough time to get to the departure point.
There will be a half-day on Multimessenger, a half-day on pulsar timing, a full day on LIGO GW analysis, followed by a half-day of GW astrophysics and a half-day on LIGO. Speakers are
  • Kendall Ackley (Monash): Multimessenger Astronomy
  • Stefan Oslowski (Swinburne): Pulsar Timing Arrays
  • Rory Smith (Monash): LIGO Data Analysis and Parameter Inference
  • Jade Powell (Swinburne): Astrophysics of LIGO sources
  • Rob Ward (ANU): How LIGO works (instrumentation)
Abstracts are located at the bottom of the page

The school will be followed by the 2018 ANITA workshop.



Monday 5th February (UWA)

8:30 - 9:00 —Registration and coffee —
9:00 - 10:30 Multimessenger Astronomy I Kendall Ackley
10:30 - 11:00 —Coffee Break —
11:00 - 12:30 Multimessenger Astronomy II Kendall Ackley
12:30 - 13:30 —Lunch —
13:30 - 15:00 Pulsar Timing Arrays I Stefan Oslowski
15:00 - 15:30 —Coffee Break —
15:30 - 17:00 Pulsar Timing Arrays II Stefan Oslowski
17:00 —Social pizza night —

Tuesday 6th February (UWA)

9:00 - 10:30 LIGO Data Analysis I Rory Smith
10:30 - 11:00 —Coffee Break —
11:00 - 12:30 LIGO Data Analysis II Rory Smith
12:30 - 13:30 —Lunch —
13:30 - 15:00 LIGO Data Analysis III Rory Smith
15:00 - 15:30 —Coffee Break —
15:30 - 17:00 LIGO Data Analysis IV Rory Smith

Wednesday 7th February (Gingin)

7:30 - 8:30 Journey to Gingin
9:00 - 10:30 Astrophysics of LIGO Sources I Jade Powell
10:30 - 11:00 —Coffee Break —
11:00 - 12:30 Astrophysics of LIGO Sources II Jade Powell
12:30 - 13:30 —Lunch —
13:30 - 15:00 How Ligo Works I Rob Ward
15:00 - 15:30 —Coffee Break —
15:30 - 17:00 How Ligo Works II Rob Ward
17:00 - 18:30 —BBQ Dinner —
18:30 - 19:30 Journey back to Perth

Abstracts

Stefan Oslowski

Pulsar Timing Arrays

The gravitational waves spectrum spans a large range of frequencies with various experiments covering different parts of the spectrum. At the low end of the spectrum, in the nanoHertz regime, we use so-calledPulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) to try and detect gravitational waves. PTAs observe tens of millisecond pulsars spread throughout our Galaxy to form a galactic-scale detector. The primary signal PTAs attempt to detect are mergers of supermassive blackholes. During this school I'll provide you with an overview of the history of PTAs, current efforts and struggles, as well as the outlook into the bright future.